Deploying compute workloads in Azure by using images and containers Part 1 – Create a VM using Azure CLI

In Lab 05 here we will deploy Docker containers into Azure Container Registry.

Connect to Azure and create a resource group and the VM.

az group create --location westeurope -n 05lab-rg
az vm create --name quickvm -g 05lab-rg --image Debian --admin-username xyz --admin-password xyz

Now check the ipadress and note it.

az vm list-ip-addresses

Now let’s connect using SSH.

ssh student@ip-adress

There you go! You just connected to your very own debian vm in Azure!

In the next post we’ll create a docker container.

Asynchronously processing messages by using Azure Queue Storage Part 4 – Download Azure Storage Explorer and add messages to the queue.

Head over to Azure Storage Explorer here and download and install.

Open and connect to your storage account and queue and add a message. Make sure you don’t encode in base64.

Run your dotnet application and watch it collect your message in your very own Azure Storage Queue!

You’ve just created a storage account, message queue and written a C# program that uses the resources. Great work!

Now go ahead and delete the storage account and the resource group if you don’t want them anymore.

az storage account delete -n lab11stgacc -g lab11-rg
az group delete -g lab11-rg

Send and receive messages with Azure Event Hubs using .NET Part 2 – Create the .NET Core console project for sending

Launch Visual Studio 2019 and create a C# .Net Core console app.

Now this first app will be the sender app so note the project and of the solution.

Open the Nuget Package console and add the nuget package as such.

Install-Package Azure.Messaging.EventHubs

There we go! Now in the next post we’ll write the code and watch our Event Hub update in the portal!